Kingdom Projects

familyThe ministry of Mobilise has an emphasis on equipping God’s army, but we also feel a responsibility to care for the poor and orphans.  We have currently taken on a Kingdom Project based in Heather’s homeland of Zimbabwe.  We are in need of supporters to come along side us.

Quick Overview of Kingdom Projects:

THE BRIDGE PROJECT

We have put together a simple plan to help feed and support a targeted number of families in Matabeleland and Mashonaland, that we have personally made contact with and are in constant communication with. Our aim is to raise funds that can be sent to them for food and basic living expenses. We hope to relieve suffering  and distress through facilitating the distribution of food, clothes, shelter, school fees, transport or medical aid.  Learn more…

Zimbabwe Facts and Figure:

  • Population: 12.9m
  • Pop. growth rate: 5%
  • GDP per capita: $1.588
  • Population below poverty line:70%
  • Life expectancy: 34 years
  • Infant mortality: 136 per 1,000 births
  • HIV prevalence: 18.1%
  • Literacy rate: 86.3 % men, 93.8 % women
  • Doctors/people: 1 per 1,000 people
  • Displaced people: 700,000
  • Refugees: 5,000
  • Human Development Index: 0.491 (HDI 2006 Rank 151)

Source: UNDP

Refugees

In 2005 more than 700,000 people were internally displaced by Operation Murambatsvina (Drive Out Trash), a three-month campaign to rid the country of slums and illegal informal businesses. The MDC accused the government of deliberately trying to weaken its urban powerbase. A report by Anna Tibaijuka, the special envoy of the UN Secretary-General, was highly critical of the campaign. A corrective Operation Garikai (Live Well) was supposed to rehouse the displaced, but little progress has been made in building accommodation.

AIDS

About two million Zimbabweans live with HIV/AIDS. Barriers to expanding effective treatment include severe foreign currency shortages, deteriorating health infrastructure and considerable loss of skills and capacity as a result of migration and AIDS mortality. According to UNICEF, Zimbabwe receives the lowest donor support in southern Africa for people living with HIV – only $4 per person per year. In comparison, neighbouring Zambia gets $184 per person per year. About two million Zimbabweans live with HIV/AIDS. Barriers to expanding effective treatment include severe foreign currency shortages, deteriorating health infrastructure and considerable loss of skills and capacity as a result of migration and AIDS mortality. According to UNICEF, Zimbabwe receives the lowest donor support in southern Africa for people living with HIV – only $4 per person per year. In comparison, neighbouring Zambia gets $184 per person per year.